sovay: (Default)
sovay ([personal profile] sovay) wrote2019-04-01 08:12 pm

I woke up in the apartment where our parents used to live

Rabbit, rabbit! Too late in the day to suggest it as a serious practice, it struck me that given the quantity of sheer alternative untruth flying around the public sphere these days, the most topsy-turvy thing one could do on April Fool's Day is tell the truth.

I like knowing about both Ghil'ad Zuckermann's work with language revival and the fossil beds of the last day of the Cretaceous.

I Married a Monster from Outer Space (1958) is the weirdest combination of feminist horror and stupider-than-ass '50's paranoia tropes. I'm glad Thomas Tryon went on to have a writing career.
gwynnega: (Default)

[personal profile] gwynnega 2019-04-02 12:54 am (UTC)(link)
I Married a Monster from Outer Space is a lot of fun, as I recall.
sholio: Prehistoric bison painting on a cave wall (Cave painting-Bison)

[personal profile] sholio 2019-04-02 01:02 am (UTC)(link)
the most topsy-turvy thing one could do on April Fool's Day is tell the truth.

As it happens, my husband (who teaches university classes) is doing EXACTLY this. He had me helping him brainstorm unlikely-sounding but true facts last night, such as weird facts to do with avian respiration and history and the like, to drop into his lecture today. I look forward to finding out how it went.

I was reading about that Cretaceous fossil bed the other day. It's so fascinating.
sholio: sun on winter trees (Default)

[personal profile] sholio 2019-04-02 08:23 am (UTC)(link)
Please report back when you do!

Haha ... so ... apparently how it went was that they didn't believe a single thing he told them, even though every single part of it was true, such as the digression on how cows have a four-chambered stomach and how ruminant digestion works.

(I should also point out that he teaches computer science, so none of this is even remotely relevant to the actual topic of today's lecture.)

I told him that ten years from now, they'll probably be reading some random website and suddenly realize that Dr. [Husband] back in college was actually telling the truth about avian respiration or the malaria cure for syphilis on that April Fool's Day so long ago.
Edited 2019-04-02 08:25 (UTC)
choco_frosh: Bede, from a MS in Benediktbeuern or someplace (baeda)

[personal profile] choco_frosh 2019-04-02 01:43 am (UTC)(link)
I like knowing about both Ghil'ad Zuckermann's work with language revival and the fossil beds of the last day of the Cretaceous.

Yes! I also like the tag about the writer of the article on the former topic.
And I totally dropped the ball on asking if you'd heard about the fossil beds from the last day of the Cretaceous!
selkie: (Default)

[personal profile] selkie 2019-04-02 01:39 pm (UTC)(link)
I was going to say, the New Yorker made me enthralled and skeptical in nearly equal parts. One can't fake microtektites, presumably, but the Hell Creek formation has been available for people to scour since my own dinosaur phase (My Visit to the Dinosaurs, Aliki, read circa 1983) and only one guy -- who rocks up to his field dig playing the Indiana Jones theme -- has mentioned this.
selkie: (Default)

[personal profile] selkie 2019-04-02 08:06 pm (UTC)(link)
Second only to Mummies!
choco_frosh: (Default)

[personal profile] choco_frosh 2019-04-02 12:38 pm (UTC)(link)
I mean - unless you've seen something that I haven't, which is extremely possible - it sounds like it might still be a fossil bed from the last day of the Cretaceous. Just not an answer to the question of whether the [megafaunal] dinosaurs were already on their way out at that point.
sholio: sun on winter trees (Default)

[personal profile] sholio 2019-04-02 05:40 pm (UTC)(link)
Yeah, I was just about to say this. I keep seeing the "debunking" links and I'm really confused, because no one is debunking what is to me the truly breathtaking, exciting thing about it - that this guy claims to have found a jumble of mud, fish, and glass spherules left by the K-T boundary impact asteroid. Everyone keeps saying "But he didn't find dinosaurs!!" and acting like that's a debunking, but the original article I read didn't even mention dinosaurs; it was just talking about a jumble of fish and mud and burnt wood, and that's what I'm wildly excited about.

If it turns out that this is all fabricated and the mud deposit isn't part of the K-T boundary at all, that'd constitute an actual debunking, but at this point I'm just seeing a lot of people seize on the dinosaurs thing, which ... has absolutely nothing to do with anything?! Fish and mud and microtektites are the exciting things here! I totally think skepticism is warranted because of the dude's "lone wolf"/"keep away from my dig site" thing, but so far no one has actually presented any evidence that it's not a K-T boundary deposit. I keep waiting for that and not seeing it.
lauradi7dw: (Default)

[personal profile] lauradi7dw 2019-04-03 02:02 am (UTC)(link)
The stuff I read is very much about the lone-wolf/keep away aspects, with documented side bits about how women doing this work don't get glowing reports in New York-based media, and how Native lands are often violated in the process of these hunts.
I have downloaded a scholarly K-T journal article for airplane reading tomorrow. It's 49 pages and I'm not a paleontologist, but I'll give it a shot.